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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
a scriptures to unite or divide? author and professor of religion at boston university, steven, joins us. president obama, act two, the president calling for unity, but hitting at divisive liberalism. what will the republicans do? congressman gomert joins us. progressive claims. this is flo. i need you. i feel so alone. but you're not alone. i knew you'd come. like i could stay away. you know i can't do this without you. you'll never have to. you're always there for me. shh! i'll get you a rental car. i could also use an umbrella. fall in love with progressive's claims service. lou: house republicans trying to pressure senate democrats to pass a budget. for the first time in almost four years. now, the republicans have up vailed a bill to suspend the debt limit with a vote set for as early as wednesday. details of that legislation include this -- suspension of the debt ceiling for three months. on the 19th of may, the debt limit increases from $16.4 trillion to accommodate addional raring the treasury requires r and bills withholes the pay of lawmakers if congress fails to pass a budget
of question about what religion he is. this is what makes it so hard for me to watch this. i think today, i am is going to clean out the attic instead of watching the inauguration. host: and that is chris in bedford, virginia. live pictures of the national mall as it fills in. 800,000 people are estimated to be here for president obama's second inaugural. that shot you see now is to give the capital. the white in the front, a friend of the mid-screen, those are seats. i guess those are reserved, so you do not have to get down there too early. the people that you see there are standing. there is a lot of standing going on, a lot of standing areas. people arrive several hours early, get through security, and wait for the events, and then join the parade. in a "usa today" this morning is this map that shows where some of the main areas of the events are taking place. here is the capital. here is the white house. the parade route will go, and here is the reviewing stand right in front of the white house here. there's a the two main places. but the third place that will get a lot of attention, were
not -- this is the supreme law of the land religion is part of me but it's not what i'm going to go to. he is not rick sanatorium he is a religious man. >> jennifer: sure, i get that. you are a performer. i'm curious what you thought about the performance of day, the delivery of this. normally you start a big speech with a couple of jokes. but you don't do that with the inauguration. >> not one president has ever told a joke in their inauguration. they tell jokes at the conventions, campaign trail, state of the union, even debates -- >> jennifer: it's so solemn. >> open a joke with what are all of you people doing my backyard something? [ laughter ] >> but i think president obama is savoring looking back at the crowd, that is human to me. he is a human being like all of us. >> jennifer: so this was also a -- these inaugural speeches some have been very brief, some very been very long. this was was 18 minutes. was it about the right length? >> i think so. jerry nabb the congressman from new york looks like he is falling asleep over and over. >> jennifer: yeah, we have his youngest d
and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere i read that the greatness of america is the right to protest for rights. >> mike: dr. king protested until the day he died by an assassin's bullet in memphis. his voice may have been silenced, but his message lives on 45 years later. joining us now from atlanta is dr. martin luther king, jr.'s niece, my good friend alvita king. >> hello, governor huckabee. it's good to be here and to the audience, hello. >> mike: well, you know, when i hear the words of your uncle, i am deeply, emotionally moved because i remember in my lifetime i've seen this incredible change in our country because of his dream and his willingness to put his life on the line to see it happen. as a member of the family, i want you to speak to, as you see
it illegal for federal and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere i read that the greatness of america is the right to protest for rights. >> mike: dr. king protested until the day he died by an assassin's bullet in memphis. his voice may have been silenced, but his message lives on 45 years later. joining us now from atlanta is dr. martin luther king, jr.'s niece, my good friend alvita king. >> hello, governor huckabee. it's good to be here and to the audience, hello. >> mike: well, you know, when i hear the words of your uncle, i am deeply, emotionally moved because i remember in my lifetime i've seen this incredible change in our country because of his dream and his willingness to put his life on the line to see it happen. as a member of the family, i want you to
makes religion into an instrument of hatred like j.b. stoner, there are plenty of those. they are near the top of the list. c-span: here is the book. second in the three volume series by taylor branch. this one is called "pillar of fire america in the king years 1963-1965." thank you. >> guest: thank you, brian. >>> you are watching book tv on c-span2. tonight we are at the national press club in washington, d.c. for their annual authors night and we are pleased to be joined here by robert merry who is the author of "where they stand the american presidents in the eyes of voters and historians." mr. merry, do we tend to like our presidents? >> i think the american people love their presidents. they love the presidency. but when they have a president that has not succeeded to the judge a failure, they vary on sentimentally cast them aside and that is our system to read that is what they were invited to do by the founders and by the constitution. >> do we have a short patience? >> we understand the constitution gave them hiring and firing authority over these guys every four years. so th
civic religion. radical still in much of the world but seemingly ordinary people can govern themselves. if we can't all agree on that and celebrate that, at least once every four years then there's something wrong with our culture >> brown: we have music. we have poetry. we got everything. >> everything, everything, wonderful >> and inclusiveness. that was the theme from beginning to end. people who often had been left out. were included. >> brown: all right. richard north and smith, annette gordon reed and beverly gauge, thank you all three >> thank you. >> ifill: and for the other news of this day, we turn to hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: there was word today that three americans died in the hostage stand-off in algeria that finally ended over the weekend. a u.s. official told the associated press that seven other americans escaped. it started wednesday when islamist militants linked to al- qaeda attacked a natural gas complex near the libyan border. algerian special forces then launched a series of operations to retake the site. today the prime minister gave his first official d
protects the people's rights of freedom of speech, freedom of press, free exercise of religion, free trade agreement of association and all other such rights of the people. my second amendment advances the fundamental principle of political equality for all by empowering congress and the states the right to regulate political spending. it will allow congress to pass campaign finance reform legislation that will withstand constitutional challenges. mr. speaker, we need to empower people, not corporations or big money special interests. our current system has been corrupted. it undermines the rights of ordinary citizens. it undermines our democracy. surely this is not the system our founders envisioned. the preamble to the constitution is we the people. let us hope that this congress doesn't forget that. i ask my colleagues to join me in supporting these important bills to reform our campaign finance laws and assure that corporate rights do not trumps people's rights. thank you. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. t
inaugural was repairing, bind up the nation's wounds. he made multiple references to god and to religion and apropos that right now, myrlie evers-williams, the widow of medgar evers, who was slain 50 years ago in 1963 is giving the benediction for these ceremonies, and this is only the second time, by the way, that a presidential inauguration has taken place on martin luther king day. the first time, don, was when you were there in the white house in 1997 for president clinton. let's listen to miss williams. >> let us act upon the meaning that everyone is included. may the inherent dignity and inalienable rights of every woman, man, boy, and girl be honored. may all your people, especially the least of these, flourish in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit of our ancestors, which has allowed us to move from a nation of unborn hopes and a history of disinfranchised votes to today's expression of a more perfect union. we ask, too, almighty, that where our paths seem blanketed by thorns of oppr
religion is to care for the widows and the orphans and jesus says at the last judgment it all comes down to how did you respond to the needs of the least of these. this is america at our best. at our best, we are a humble people and we remember the call to have passion for the least of these. that is why it's etched inside the sought of liberty give me your tired and poor, the send these the homeless to me. i lift my lamp beside the golden door. humility and compassion for the oh pressed are central to the heart and character and are meant to be central to the heart and character of this nation. the second thing we learn is the importance of having a vision. a professor retired from harvard business school noted tasks of any important leader are to cast a vision for the too much and to inspire people to pursue it. it has to be a clear picture of where we want to go, a preferred picture of the future. he led the slaves out of egypt but that was not enough. quickly they began to desire to go back to egypt. the wilderness was hard. he had to constantly remind them of the vision. he said her
. i am speaking of that force which all of the great religions have seen as the supreme unifying principle of life. love is somehow the key that unlocks the door which leads to ultimate reality. this hindu-muslim-christian- jewish-buddhist belief about ultimate reality is beautifully summed up in the first epistle of saint john: "let us love one another (yes), for love is god. (yes) and every one that loveth is born of god and knoweth god. he that loveth not knoweth not god, for god is love. if we love one another, god dwelleth in us and his love is perfected in us." let us hope that this spirit will become the order of the day. we can no longer afford to worship the god of hate or bow before the altar of retaliation. the oceans of history are made turbulent by the ever-rising tides of hate. history is cluttered with the wreckage of nations and individuals that pursued this self-defeating path of hate. as arnold toynbee says: "love is the ultimate force that makes for the saving choice of life and good against the damning choice of death and evil. therefore the first hope in our
for themselves. james has it this way, true religion undefiled before god is to care for the widows and the orphan and jesus as the last judgment all comes down to this, how did you respond to the needs of the least of these? this is america at our best. outer banks we are humble people and remember the call to have compassion for the least of these, which is why in this magnificent home in the statue of liberty or give me your tired, poor huddled masses yearning to breathe free. the rest age, sending us, the homeless to me. i lift my lamp beside the golden door. humility and courageous compassion for the marginalized in the oppressed are central to the heart and character of those days and are meant to be central to the heart and character of this nation. the second thing we learned from those days is the importance of having a vision. professor john potter now retired from business school netted two of the most important tasks of any theater are to cast a compelling vision for the future and inspire and motivate people to burst do it. that vision has to be clear and compelling pic
's own body should be left up to that woman in consultation with her doctor, her family, and her religion, not the federal government. there's now a generation of women who do not remember the time before roe vs. wade. a time when men assumed they could say what women could and could not do about their personal private health care and reproduction. we still have a lot of work to do. unfortunately, over the past 40 years there have been numerous legislative attempts to deny this right to women and treat women who exercise control over their own bodies as criminals. we have to make sure that we defend also title 10, maternal and child health care programs, public access to reproductive health care, and that we re-authorize the violence against women act. but we must remember the time before roe vs. wade. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from colorado seek recognition? if the gentlewoman from colorado is recognized for one minute. ms. degette: thank you, mr. speaker. yesterday in his inaugural address our president reminded us o
where they can look at the blessing. >> i think that what's helping this family is their religion, their community. they're embedded in a community, and many people in this country are not. you know, there's been a tremendous loss of community and connections with people. so, you know, i would just say, you know, build up your community and your connections, because this kind of thing can happen to any one of us at any moment. >> salgo: i want to go back very quickly to this whole concept of complicated grief, or whatever you'd like to call it. there's this -- there's a list. extreme depression, focus on the loss, intense longing -- that just goes on, and you get stuck, i thinkwas the phrase that you used. if someone has these symptoms, what do you do about it? is there medical intervention that works? >> well, i think, first of all, all those symptoms are probably normal for a while. and what i really look at is, are they interfering with the person's functioning. otherwise, a lot of those things are normal and can continue for a long time. >> but i think when they're interfering
we worship a real god and they worship the false god. never mind the fact that both religions agree it is the same god. here's jerry boykin on fox news on sunday. >> mixing the genders in those combat units where there is no privacy, where they're out on extended operations and there's no opportunity for people to have any privacy whatsoever. i certainly don't want to be in that environment with a female because it's degrading and human igiating enough to have -- humiliating enough to do your personal hygiene and the normal functions among your teammates. >> john: eric, is he saying we can send them to kill people and be killed and be shot at but it must be degrading if someone sees my wee-wee? >> yeah. the idea that this hasn't been discussed within the pentagon for at least a decade. hasn't been signed off by all of the senior officials and things like that. i mean what do these people think? obama called up the generals and said make this happen? for someone like boykin who's been in the military to pretend he has no idea, you know, how decisions are made in the military, it is k
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)